How Do the Chinese Perceive Leadership Trainings?

Pete Marchetto(Freelance writer, author, journalist, photographer and computer arts at Self-employed): From what I’ve seen, from the managers I’ve met both in education and industry, they feel they have little or nothing to learn.

It’s also worth noting that management training here would have to take account of certain built-in local conditions. These are liable to intrude upon any idealized style of management.

Iain Wyder(Executive Director Educational Projects at Jiazhong Investment Company Ltd): I agree with both your points Pete for Chinese owned firms – of course the multinationals are different in that they mostly report to overseas bosses. Those “local conditions” you talk about create real difficulties for most westerners joining local firms!

Pete Marchetto(Freelance writer, author, journalist, photographer and computer arts at Self-employed):  It’s also surprising how generic those difficulties can be.

I worked for a while here in industry and read an article from someone himself working in an entirely different sector in a different part of the country. My English colleague and I read it and were amazed to see our Chinese colleagues described to the level of the most subtle of nuances.

Becky Liu(Business Development Manager at Reality Click Consulting): Because of the need for competing in the world economy and since Chinese companies look overseas more, they understand the need to adapt to modern or more ‘different’ approaches to leadership and people skills. They are now more willing to learn new ideas to not only stay competitive but to have their companies better prepared for working with international companies.

Yes, there is a very large demand for it. We are receiving more and more requests for management training in what would one classify as modern or western (it certainly is different from traditional Chinese business model) and staff training in learning more international business skills.

Chinese companies are moving more to international practices to stay ahead of the game and our feedback has been very positive.

Pete Marchetto(Freelance writer, author, journalist, photographer and computer arts at Self-employed): It doesn’t surprise me this is happening, particularly in Shanghai, Shenzhen, Beijing perhaps and a few other places which are increasingly seeing overseas companies as their direct competitors.

However, I don’t think Debardarshi would be advised trying to sell his ideas around most ofChina… at least not to the businesses I’ve seen out here in the hinterlands. And let’s face it, that’s most of the country.

Becky Liu(Business Development Manager at Reality Click Consulting): @Pete – I agree with your comment that most of the companies we train and provide assistance to are mainly from the large cities and outlying neighbors (Shanghai and their neighborsJiangsu andZhejiang) but taken in context, these three areas combined have a GDP larger thanAustralia. It provides for a very large market.

Debadarshi Sengupta(National Specialist Trainer at Tata AIG Life Insurance): Lovely comments. Thank you! For a country that has produced the greatest of minds and has a very rich culture, I would assume that it would be open to change and learning! Even though self Contentedness can spell disaster. Would be glad to explore any options if available!

Paul Murphy(Training Director at NewSkilz Corporate Traininig (Shanghai, China)): Many firms ask for quotations for leadership training workshops. But when you ask them for details of what problems they are facing and their specific training goals… many just say ‘Give for me quotation!’

Sadly, many HR staff are are not so organized here and tend to go about gathering quotations without really giving training vendors much needs analysis data to go on.

Debadarshi Sengupta(National Specialist Trainer at Tata AIG Life Insurance): Look like it would need a Chinese person to start the need analysis as without that, there is no point really and could end up being a case of fitting a square peg in a round hole!

Paul Murphy(Training Director at NewSkilz Corporate Traininig (Shanghai, China)): Paul… Hmm…
With incomprehension of the basics so extreme maybe I should set myself up in business selling common sense.
I do wonder here how some businesses survive. There’s such a mix between the sussed, the comprehending and the incomprehensible.
Well okay, we know how they survive I guess.

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